Posts Tagged FSM

Code and error handling strategies and FSMs

We’ve had a discussion in the office on and off over a few days about error handling in programmes. Neither my office mate nor I are completely happy with what’s available out there. The state of the art in imperative/OO languages appears to be stuck at exceptions. The new Go programming language eschews them, essentially going back to having a named parameter for returning errors – which needs to be checked for.

The essential problem in programming is, of course, that code may follow a number of paths. Some of those paths are, at some level, the most common or desired paths (often, just 1 path). Other paths may be taken, e.g. because a resource was unavailable or because the requested action was inappropriate or unreasonable in some way. Of those other paths, some may still be reasonably commonly taken (e.g. a file not existing) and/or recoverable in some way. Other paths may be exceptional in some way such that it is unlikely  to recover from having taken them. These paths converge at function/procedure call nodes, where they have to be dispatched to direct programme flow onward to the appropriate further path.

My own sense is that path selection syntax/support in programming languages tends to divide all error/return handling into 1 of those 3 cases.

  1. The primary path(s)
  2. Recoverable error paths
  3. Unrecoverable error paths

What then are the ways to handle these cases?  In languages such as C, errors generally must be handled after each function call, acting on them according to return value or a modified parameter. There are of course other ways, such as signals and exceptions.

There is also another way, which I see much less often, but which has certain benefits, which is to use Finite State Machines (FSMs) to give objects an idempotent error state. This allows control-flow in calling code to bunch together operations without having to worry about errors, as the error-handling can be done later, separately.

This blog tries to go over these methods, and their benefits and pitfalls. I’d also be really interested to hear about other error-handling strategies, especially better ones! 🙂

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